Servanthood and Thinking Changes are Congruent

There are countless books on leadership, goal setting and personal growth in our society. Oprah has even developed a new show on her “OWN” network called ‘Master Class.’ The show highlights the life work and achievements of prominent people in society. However, there are many fewer resources, TV shows, books, seminars and college classes dedicated to the concept of servanthood.

According to Merriam Webster, servanthood is defined as “one who services others; especially: one that performs duties about the person or home of a master or personal employer.” Our culture especially abhors even the idea of having a master. Since our country was built on the despicable institution of slavery that perspective is perfectly understandable. However, whether we admit it or not, we are all servants of something. For some it is their career, for others it is money. For those who are faithful to the practices of a peace-loving religion, servanthood is a countercultural approach to life. For those interested in extreme thinking and lifestyle changes, servanthood provides a strong foundation to countering destructive patterns of thinking and behavior.

Developing a servanthood perspective in one’s thinking and behavior is thoroughly consistent with cognitive-behavioral approaches to changing the distorted thinking patterns of the Power Thrust, Uniqueness and Criminal Pride.

  • Power Thrust: The compelled need to be in control of every situation
  • Uniqueness: Sees self as different and better than others
  • Criminal Pride: False Pride

The act of serving others requires us to put others needs before our own thereby counterbalancing and preventing us from engaging in controlling behaviors. Thoughts that center on power over and control of others can be replaced with their polar opposites. When criminal thinkers feel like screaming at their children for missing the bus again and then consider ways to punish and belittle them, they must learn to stop and realize they must not attempt to control others. They must accept that aggressive controlling behavior is a failure to make the necessary changes needed in their lives. They must stop and think about the negative ripple effect of consequences, in their life and the lives of those around them, that their controlling behavior has caused. Helping a child to discover, experience and learn from the natural consequences of their misbehavior requires no aggressive or demeaning behavior. Hurtful words and actions are a result of automatic and uncreative thinking.

3 Thoughts On Servanthood and Thinking Changes are Congruent

  1. I love this! The concept is helpful in my work as an addictions and mental health counselor, but more importantly, as a mother. In the short 17 months I’ve spent being a mother I’ve learned how often we do things that we pretend are in the best interests of others, but are really out of our own convenience. The servanthood perspective makes so much sense to me and I plan on incorporating it into my life as much as possible.

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"An approach to the treatment of offenders which emphasizes the role of altering thinking patterns in bringing about change in an offender's life."