Reading for Receptivity and Change

Receive, Read, Research, Remember, Reflect and Respond. The second “R,” in this list of actions to become inspired with the truth, is “Read.”  In Rick Warren’s book, the Purpose Driven Life, this second “R” is about reading the bible.  However, reading many positive, life-affirming books can help us understand the truth about living a responsible and victim-free life.  One of the benefits of reading for an addict and criminal thinker is that the book can’t be interrupted.  When criminal thinkers hear something that they dislike or disagree with they tend to cut the conversation short or interrupt and argue their point of view.  Reading the printed word allows distorted thinking to slowly be replaced with positive concepts.  A book can’t be interrupted unless it is closed so challenge yourself to pick up a book and read daily!

Destructive and distorted thinking is the result of many bad thinking habits such as closing off what we don’t want to hear or continually viewing oneself as a victim in situations that we could have prevented.  Reading books about taking personal responsibility, changing one’s habits and achieving legitimate success is a critical practice for anyone interested in lasting change. If you don’t know where to start, ask a counselor, responsible friend, pastor or your local librarian about a good book recommendation!  There is a vast universe of knowledge available to everyone on their journey through sobriety, criminal freedom and earthly and spiritual wellness.

A few good books to consider for someone early in recovery are:


The six “R’s” of receptivity and change

Sorry we're closedThe ‘Closed Channel Thinking’ error consists of three distinct parts; no disclosure, not receptive, no self-criticism.  Any one of these components will lead to a closed thinking channel which is required for meaningful change and growth.  Thankfully, there are many ways to keep an open channel which will allow for the possibility of being positively influenced and receptive to change.  In the book, the Purpose Driven Life, five R’s are suggested that can help the recovering criminal thinker and even the responsible ones among us on that journey. I added a sixth:

  • Receive
  • Read
  • Research
  • Remember
  • Reflect
  • Respond

First we need to RECEIVE the message.  Receiving a positive message means allowing yourself to hear it.  Listening is more important than speaking for someone interested in learning and change.  My mother used to tell me God gave you two ears and one mouth so you should listen twice as much as you speak!  If you feel like closing the door on someone who is speaking the truth or running away from the responsible voice of a friend, it is at those times we must be the most open.  When the message hurts and challenges our fundamental beliefs we can engage in active listening and challenge ourselves to see what is true about our selves in the message.  If our first instinct is to quickly respond and contradict the message we are receiving, we should do the opposite and discover how the message is true in our lives.  If it is too emotional a task at the moment to respond with kindness and humility, assume the posture of openness and thank the person for their feedback and tell them honestly that you will look into it.  The feedback we most despise is often the very key to fundamental change and growth.

The next blog post will focus on Reading as a method to maintaining a clear and open channel of thinking!


Reading with a sense of purpose

One of my favorite things to do is to read with a sense of purpose.  One of my most favorite management books is the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey.  My father gave me this book many years ago when I was a drug and alcohol counselor at Rock Valley Correctional Programs in Beloit, WI.  I read each chapter with the clear intention to apply what I learned to my work in that organization.  So many of the principles seemed to directly relate to my work with offenders.  I was encouraged that other counselors were also reading the book so I assumed they would also be trying to apply what they learned to their work.  The book had such an impact on my thinking that I couldn’t see how anyone could read it and not want to immediately apply the lessons to their own lives and the lives of their clients!  I quickly learned that reading does not necessarily result in action.  Many of my colleagues continued with their work life in the same manner as before which was quite a shock to me.  How can someone read such excellent and practical words and not make a change?  In reality, it happens every day in the lives of our clients as well as in our own lives.  Just reading or listening is often not enough to motivate us to action.  We need to make a decision that we will learn and apply the knowledge of others in our lives.  Similar to the third step of Alcoholics Anonymous, which says, “Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him,” we cannot grow and change if we are not willing to take that next intellectual step of deciding to change.


"An approach to the treatment of offenders which emphasizes the role of altering thinking patterns in bringing about change in an offender's life."